ladyofthemoor (ladyofthemoor) wrote,
ladyofthemoor
ladyofthemoor

  • Mood:

The Sword and the Leper: The Two Chieftains

I am still occupied with the “The Sword and the Leper”, a story about St. Brigid in which her father, a chieftain, tries to sell her to a neighbouring chieftain because she gives away all the food there is in the larder. The neighbouring chieftain does not want to buy Brigid, because she is “too honest” for him. Frankly she had said to him that she would give away all his wealth and that of her father to the sisters and brothers of Christ.

I want to reflect a little bit more on the two chieftains, because they have the same position in society; they are both chieftain, master of a household and the card that I have pulled for their attitude in me are both sad cards.

For the father, who sells Brigid, I had pulled: Three of Quills (Three of Swords) which meant to my that I tend to act cruel and ungenerous when I have feelings of loss and sorrow, when I feel an emptiness inside. 

                               

For the neighbouring chieftain who does not want to buy Brigid, I had pulled Four of Quills (Four of Swords), on which a young woman lies in a bed, gravely ill. She has neglected herself, because she is heartbroken. Buying Brigid would mean being heartbroken, confronted with the struggle for existence of people, with poverty, sickness and anxiety, because Brigid is associated to them by her attitude. 

                                               
                                    
Interesting is that these both cards that show an attitude of “no” towards the generous Brigid, are cards of loss and sorrow, caused by unanswered love. So, my feeling of not being loved brings forth ungenerous behaviour in both cases.

To me Marianne Dashwood on Four of Quills is the worst of these two cards, because the lack of physical self-care and the hopelessness that speaks from it. Jane Bennet on Three of Quills takes care of herself; she is dressed beautiful and there are many flowers in the card. The roses have sharp thorns, but nevertheless, these flowers breath the hope of spring. It is odd that I find the card for the neighbouring chieftain worse than the one for the father, because giving away your own daughter is much worse than not buying a daughter from your neighbour.

But, you could also say that there is no hope for the world if one knows what is honest, as the neighbouring chieftain does: namely that one should help the sick and the needy, but at the same time rejects the one who acts upon it, Brigid.

Here is my inner conflict (again): must do something (for the sick and the needy), but cannot because of the feelings of loss and emptiness.

This must be it for tonight. It is late already.
Tags: brigit, four of swords, saint, tarot of jane austen, three of swords
Subscribe
  • Post a new comment

    Error

    default userpic

    Your reply will be screened

    Your IP address will be recorded 

    When you submit the form an invisible reCAPTCHA check will be performed.
    You must follow the Privacy Policy and Google Terms of use.
  • 2 comments