ladyofthemoor (ladyofthemoor) wrote,
ladyofthemoor
ladyofthemoor

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A Teaching of the Sukkah

Sukkot is long over now, but I was too busy too post all my thoughts about it. Here they come. Maybe one time I can put them all together for a workshop about Sukkot. 

             

An interesting feature about the building of the Sukkah is that it must be simple, and it is always simple but there is also the common practice to decorate it. They often look very nice. This is because the Talmud associates the Sukkah with beauty. It is a special kind of beauty which is meant here. 

           

The etrog tree is used in the Talmud to define what is beautiful. The etrog is used as one of the Four Species during Sukkot. What is so special about the etrog? The etrog grows, blossoms and produces fruit throughout all seasons. It does so in the heat, the cold, the storm and the rain. Thus, beauty to the Talmud means, ‘to persist’ and to ‘to endure’, the determination to live on during difficulties and hardship. You could say it is the belief life has more power than death. 

 
                     

So this is the thought behind the nice round pumpkins for the door of the primitive Sukkah’s reminding of the journey in the desert, of the flowers on the table and the children-drawings hanging on the walls: they all show that in the end life prevails over death, that in difficult circumstances it is important to cling to life, to beauty. 

These insights give thoughts questions that can be answered by drawing tarot cards, such as: What does beauty mean to me? What is my most valuable instrument in difficult circumstances? What helps me, or how can I apply this special concept of beauty as an instrument to endure in difficult times?
Tags: spread, sukkot
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